[]
[]
Please place holds ONLY on items that are checked out and unavailable. Thank you!

A Tale for the Time Being

[a Novel]
Ozeki, Ruth L. (Book - 2013 )
Average Rating: 4 stars out of 5.
A Tale for the Time Being
Print

Item Details

In Tokyo, sixteen-year-old Nao has decided there's only one escape from her aching loneliness and her classmates' bullying. But before she ends it all, Nao first plans to document the life of her great grandmother, a Buddhist nun who's lived more than a century. A diary is Nao's only solace--and will touch lives in ways she can scarcely imagine. Across the Pacific, we meet Ruth, a novelist living on a remote island who discovers a collection of artifacts washed ashore in a Hello Kitty lunchbox--possibly debris from the devastating 2011 tsunami. As the mystery of its contents unfolds, Ruth is pulled into the past, into Nao's drama and her unknown fate, and forward into her own future.
Authors: Ozeki, Ruth L.
Title: A tale for the time being
[a novel]
Publisher: New York :, Viking,, 2013.
Characteristics: 422 pages ;,24 cm
Content Type: text
Media Type: unmediated
Carrier Type: volume
Notes: Subtitle from jacket.
Summary: In Tokyo, sixteen-year-old Nao has decided there's only one escape from her aching loneliness and her classmates' bullying. But before she ends it all, Nao first plans to document the life of her great grandmother, a Buddhist nun who's lived more than a century. A diary is Nao's only solace--and will touch lives in ways she can scarcely imagine. Across the Pacific, we meet Ruth, a novelist living on a remote island who discovers a collection of artifacts washed ashore in a Hello Kitty lunchbox--possibly debris from the devastating 2011 tsunami. As the mystery of its contents unfolds, Ruth is pulled into the past, into Nao's drama and her unknown fate, and forward into her own future.
ISBN: 0670026638
9780670026630
Statement of Responsibility: Ruth Ozeki
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Subject Headings: Vancouver Island (B.C.) Fiction. Tokyo (Japan) Fiction. Women authors Fiction. Buddhist nuns Fiction. Teenage girls Fiction.
Genre/Form: Psychological fiction.
Topical Term: Women authors
Buddhist nuns
Teenage girls
LCCN: 2012039878
MARC Display»

Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

Jul 02, 2014
  • oO_Oo rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

I started reading this book, and initially thought "What the heck is going on here?" But I was glad I continued. I got sucked into the characters the more I read. They seemed believable and likeable, despite the somewhat mysterious premise. Ozeki's account of the Buddhist nun seems pretty good, not too orientalizing, not treating her like some odd exotic specimen. All in all, a worthwhile read.

Mar 29, 2014
  • lpodell rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

Read half liked girls voice, but just couldn't get interested enough to finish. May have been my restlessness

Mar 03, 2014
  • TerryNewberg rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

wonderful story telling going on, the blend of fact and fiction, the buddhist flavor, the bit of magic, the need to know --- being a time being -- writers and women will relate especially to this tale

Feb 23, 2014
  • Maggie98013 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Some painful, uncomfortable passages - but overall a fabulous, thoughtful story. Really got me thinking. Highly recommend!

Jan 21, 2014
  • Poodles rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

Ruth Ozeki writes herself into this novel and I found myself disliking her character. This was an uncomfortable feeling since I doubted the writer had distinguished the character from herself. I read the book for the Cortes setting, for the Buddhist temple setting and for the Jiko character. The Zen quantum physics did not draw me in.

Nov 29, 2013
  • diggie rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

the most fully-realized of ozeki's novels to date, though not quite perfect, is fascinating, wise, funny, and warm.

the tale of two women, a Buddhist nun and a blocked novelist, on opposite sides of the Pacific, and a bullied Tokyo schoolgirl spin their stories loosely together. Ozeki is as much a filmmaker as a writer and i couldn't help imagining the movie.

Oct 14, 2013
  • mjkedzior rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Facinating blend of stories of two worlds. Wonderful characters!

Aug 09, 2013
  • pokano rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

I liked Ozeki's My Year of Meats, but A Tale for the Time Being is by far a better and more mature book. Ruth, a writer, and her husband live a fairly rustic life on a small island in British Columbia. One day they find a Japanese diary, memo book, and letters carefully wrapped in plastic on the beach, possibly the flotsam from the Tohoku tsunami. The diary was written by a Japanese teenager who used to live in California and appears to be a disaffected Valley Girl. Ruth's life and the Japanese girl's lives intertwine as Ruth tries to track down what happened to her. This book is both challenging and engrossing and totally worthwhile.

Jul 29, 2013
  • pink_armadillo_78 rated this: 2.5 stars out of 5.

I wanted to like this book (I'm really interested in Japan and Zen buddhism) but it just never grabbed me. Neither of the two main characters felt that interesting or their lives that suspenseful.

Jul 24, 2013
  • crystine rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

This was a beautiful, thought provoking book.

View All Comments

Age

Add Age Suitability

There are no ages for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

Jun 26, 2014
  • bixby rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

A Canadian writer finds a freezer bag containing a young Japanese girl's diary which might have washed across the Pacific after the tsunami. The chapters go back and forth between the writer and the diary pages, keeping you enthralled and wondering if you will ever know what became of her. Fascinating!

Notices

Add a Notice

There are no notices for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

Jun 26, 2014
  • bixby rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

From Le temps retrouve (Time Regained) by Marcel Proust, as quoted in A Tale for the Time Being by Ruth Ozeki:
"In reality, every reader, while he is reading, is the reader of his own self. The writer's work is merely a kind of optical instrument, which he offers to the reader to permit him to discern what, without the book, he would perhaps never have seen in himself. The reader's recognition in his own self of what the book says is the proof of its truth."

Videos

Add a Video

There are no videos for this title yet.

Find it at LFL

  Loading...

Powered by BiblioCommons.